Photographer take pictures as the Soyuz TMA-10M spacecraft carrying the International Space Station (ISS) crew of U.S. astronaut U.S. astronaut Michael Hopkins, Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy blasts off from the launch pad at the Baikonur cosmodrome September 26, 2013. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov  (KAZAKHSTAN - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)

I could use a cold brewski, Brian Kelley (known as B.K.) announces as he walks into the front lounge of a stuffy tour bus on a stifling August day. No problem. He opens a small sliding door, and as if by magic, reveals several beer bottles packed in ice. Looking for things to do? Select one or more criteria to search Kid-friendly Get ideas Hovering over six feet tall, Kelley, 28, sits down, leans back and props his legs up on a small counter across the aisle as his duo partner, Tyler Hubbard, appears. Hubbard, 26, grabs a granola bar out of a makeshift kitchen cabinet and takes a seat. Just a couple of everyday guys, hanging out before taking the stage in Richmond in front of 6,000 screaming fans. Fifteen months ago, these dudes didnt have a record deal. Now theyre shattering music records while taking Nashville by storm . On Sunday, the 20,000-plus expected to gather at Merriweather Post Pavilion for the annual Sunday in the Country festival will see Kelley and Hubbard right before they graduate to the next level of stardom: their first national headlining tour, which kicks off Thursday. Fans will pack in to hear feel-good party songs from the duos platinum-selling debut album, Heres to the Good Times , and especially the inescapable crossover smash Cruise, which recently spent 22 weeks at No. 1, making Billboard country chart history. As Florida Georgia Line keeps ascending, the duo is also being credited or blamed, depending on whom you ask for helping to change the sound of modern country music.

Doc shows how Muscle Shoals put funk into music, with Aretha Franklin, Percy Sledge and even the Rolling Stones

Teddy, above, and Richard Thompson perform Friday at Town Hall.

As Greg Camaliers movie dutifully points out, this sleepy town and its two nondescript studios FAME Studios and Muscle Shoals Sound provided the inspiration and fidelity behind such gut-wrenching classics as Aretha Franklins I Never Loved a Man, the Staples Singers Ill Take You There, Percy Sledges When a Man Loves a Woman and gripping records by Etta James, Wilson Pickett and Arthur Alexander. Later, the studios helped capture the heat of rock acts like the Stones, Bob Seger and Lynyrd Skynyrd. Magnolia Pictures Rick Hall and Clarence Carter in Muscle Shoals The story of Muscle Shoals, like many that began in the 1960s, touches on race and politics, as well as music. Casual fans might be surprised to learn that the core band on some of historys most soulful music was entirely Caucasian. At the time, that also came as news to Aretha Franklin and Wilson Pickett, who speak in the flick. We hear too from Bono, Keith Richards, Gregg Allman, Steve Winwood, Jimmy Cliff and Clarence Carter. Aretha talks about finally finding her sound at FAME in 1967, after years of tepid, overproduced records for Columbia. Atlantic Records late exec Jerry Wexler brought her down there. The rhythm section of drummer Roger Hawkins and bassist David Hood, along with players like Spooner Oldham, Jimmy Johnson and Barry Beckett, created a sound as forceful, honed and profound as Franklins voice. One reason had to do with the close placement of the mikes to Hawkins drums, creating a special crispness and intimacy. Creative czar Hall arises as a fascinating, if forbidding, character.

Club drug ‘Molly’ taking a toll on electronic music party scene

RELATED: ‘MOLLY’ OVERDOSE CAUSED ELECTRIC ZOO DEATHS: CITY In the New York concert deaths, the medical examiner found lethal mixtures of MDMA and methylone, a synthetic stimulant, the DEA said. “It’s exactly the same phenomenon that occurred with ecstasy a decade ago,” said Dr. Charles Grob, a professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at the UCLA School of Medicine and an expert on MDMA. “Ecstasy had terrible reliability and it’s the same with Molly. Though it’s being marketed as pure MDMA, it’s a hoax.” Overdose symptoms can include rapid heart beat, overheating, excessive sweating, shivering and involuntary twitching. RELATED: SCHUMER TARGETS “MOLLY” A NEW FORM OF ECSTASY Grob said references in pop culture can fan misconceptions. Miley Cyrus admitted in July that a lyric in her new dance anthem “We Can’t Stop” was a reference to Molly. Last year at a Miami concert, Madonna, the mother of a teenager, asked: “How many people in this crowd have seen Molly?” She later said she was referring to a friend. The illusion that MDMA is somehow less harmful has been branded with Molly, according to Anna. “I have definitely heard that people think that it’s pure. I have some friends that are like ‘I only want to do Molly. I won’t do other stuff’ because it’s marketed as something that’s somehow better,” said Anna.