Drive-in with four movies this summer, projecting D.C.-themed films on the market’s three-story-high white wall. The five fall films will run on Fridays from Oct. 4 – Nov. 8 and embrace each day’s unofficial holiday. This is just one casual movie watcher’s opinion, but the films definitely seem to have a wider appeal than the last time around. The schedule is as follows: Oct. 4: “Caddyshack,” in honor of National Golf Day Oct. 11: “Julie and Julia,” in honor of National Cookbook Launch Day Oct. 18: “Good Will Hunting,” in honor of National No Beard Day Nov. 1: “Evan Almighty,” in honor of All Saints’ Day Nov. 8: People’s choice. The people’s choice film will be voted on by members of the public via social media, although more details on that voting were not immediately available. All films begin at 8 p.m., with cars being let into the parking lot across from the market starting at 6 p.m. During the summer series, festival organizers took reservations for a certain number of spots in the parking lot and left some open for first come, first served. The market also reserves a picnic area in front of the parking lot for those coming via walking or biking, and some Union Market vendors will be serving food, drinks and snacks during the movies.

Just as we’d heard when it first popped up a couple of years ago , that large setup fee buys the Cinema Player, a rack-mountable box loaded with a 2TB hard drive and enough DRM to keep the studios happy, plus a wired fingerprint reader used to ensure the owner’s identity. Movies download automatically to its hard drive in the background so they’re already there when the owner chooses to unlock them for viewing. That privilege costs $500 ($600 for 3D), good for one showing within 24 hours. Check after the break for more of our impressions after a quick preview at Prima’s CEDIA 2013 booth, then prep your black card for the pricey purchase. We saw a bit of Ron Howard’s new flick, Rush, a movie that popped up on Prima’s systems last week even before it was available at most theaters nationwide. The movies play in 1080p/24 and are encoded in “higher than Blu-ray quality” with lossless PCM or Dolby TrueHD audio. In our brief viewing it certainly seemed on-par with a theater experience, although at this price we’d hope a 4K option arrives sooner rather than later. Of course, other than the steep entry fee there are a few other hurdles to jump before you can obtain one of these. It’s only for home use in theaters that seat fewer than 25 people, with a check of the purchaser’s background to weed out pirates, and the box requires a public static IP to make sure it stays where it’s registered. Past that process, once it’s all set up owners enjoy the kind of access usually restricted to the well-connected studio elite, screening the newest flicks at their leisure. Or, almost at their leisure, because while there’s a pause button and a five minute skip, the usual playback controls aren’t present here.

$35,000 Prima Cinema Player brings movies home as soon as they hit theaters (eyes-on)

Prima Cinema

Porn she absolutely forbids, no discussion. But hes an addict. Though its set in New Jersey rather than Brooklyn , Don Jon — written and directed with frenzied energy by Gordon-Levitt — cheerfully steals from the 1977 Saturday Night Fever in its tale of an Italian-American stud-slash-dolt who harbors a spark of life that draws him toward the wider world. Its even more condescending to the small-minded characters around him, if thats possible. Don Jon is also fast and funny. Jons deliverance comes in the form of a messed-up pothead named Esther who sees through his insulation and tells him what he needs to hear. The down-shift from cartoon romance to romantic drama would be jarring if Esther were played by a lesser actress than Julianne Moore, who makes the wisdom shes given to deliver sound like good hard sense from an older woman whos been through hell. Shes touching, Johansson is wonderfully awful and Gordon-Levitt is electric, making it easy to forgive the movie its meannesses. Unless you happen to be Italian-American. Don Jon, from Relativity Media, is playing across the U.S. Rating: **** (Seligman) Muscle Shoals Songs as energizing as When a Man Loves a Woman and Brown Sugar leave us wanting more, so maybe its fitting that a documentary about the place that delivered those gutbucket classics does the same. But Muscle Shoals , Greg Freddy Camaliers feature-length film hitting select theaters before airing on PBS in early 2014, leaves us unsatisfied for all the wrong reasons. Ruminations on Native American legends and Helen Kellers water pump would be fine in an Alabama travelogue, but in Muscle Shoals? Couldnt we please get back to Mustang Sally? Rock Superstars In the 1960s, Muscle Shoals, the backwoods Alabama town that housed FAME recording studio and its rival facility Muscle Shoals Sound Studios, drew rock and soul superstars looking to tap the areas homegrown funk rhythms. Some, like Aretha Franklin, were surprised to learn that those beats came from a rhythm section composed entirely of white boys barely out of their teens — the Swampers, as they came to be known (and name-checked in Lynyrd Skynyrds Sweet Home Alabama). Muscle Shoals explores the cross-racial camaraderie that launched gems from Arthur Alexanders Anna to Paul Simons Kodachrome. Wonderful old footage shows the Rolling Stones hearing their first playback of Wild Horses and Franklin laying down the opening piano chords of I Never Loved a Man the Way that I Loved You. Alongside interviews with Mick Jagger, Percy Sledge, Keith Richards, Jimmy Cliff, Bono and Clarence Carter, among many others, the film properly credits FAME founder Rick Hall as the man who started it all.