$35,000 Prima Cinema Player brings movies home as soon as they hit theaters (eyes-on)

Prima Cinema

Prima Cinema has an answer, with the minor requirement of $35,000 (and a few other details) to get your home theater ready for first-run movies. Just as we’d heard when it first popped up a couple of years ago , that large setup fee buys the Cinema Player, a rack-mountable box loaded with a 2TB hard drive and enough DRM to keep the studios happy, plus a wired fingerprint reader used to ensure the owner’s identity. Movies download automatically to its hard drive in the background so they’re already there when the owner chooses to unlock them for viewing. That privilege costs $500 ($600 for 3D), good for one showing within 24 hours. Check after the break for more of our impressions after a quick preview at Prima’s CEDIA 2013 booth, then prep your black card for the pricey purchase. We saw a bit of Ron Howard’s new flick, Rush, a movie that popped up on Prima’s systems last week even before it was available at most theaters nationwide. The movies play in 1080p/24 and are encoded in “higher than Blu-ray quality” with lossless PCM or Dolby TrueHD audio. In our brief viewing it certainly seemed on-par with a theater experience, although at this price we’d hope a 4K option arrives sooner rather than later. Of course, other than the steep entry fee there are a few other hurdles to jump before you can obtain one of these. It’s only for home use in theaters that seat fewer than 25 people, with a check of the purchaser’s background to weed out pirates, and the box requires a public static IP to make sure it stays where it’s registered. Past that process, once it’s all set up owners enjoy the kind of access usually restricted to the well-connected studio elite, screening the newest flicks at their leisure. Or, almost at their leisure, because while there’s a pause button and a five minute skip, the usual playback controls aren’t present here. The other fly in the ointment is a relatively short list of available titles. Universal is an investor and its movies are among those listed, with selections also popping up from others like Millennium Films.

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From that day, I was hooked,” he says. Even today, he remembers every movie moment with clarity; even obscure films like Ma Ke Aansoo starring Ajit and Nalini Jaywant. Kashmir changed with the rise of the separatist movement in 1989. Cinema halls became an ideological casualty as militants ordered their closure for being “un-Islamic”. All theatres in Srinagar – Palladium, Broadway, Neelam, Regal, Naz, Shah, Khayam, Khyber, Shiraj and Firdaus – shut down. Three cinema halls – Broadway, Neelam and Regal – were brave enough to reopen. But grenades ensured they didn’t stay open for long. When Regal reopened with Sunny Deol’s Pyar Koi Khel Nahin in September 1999, militants lobbed three hand grenades at viewers coming out of the hall the very first day. One person died, and a dozen were injured. Broadway too didn’t last long. Even the best movies couldn’t pull crowds; the risk didn’t seem to be worth it. Neelam, locals say, shut shop sometime in 2010. The only time you hear of Srinagar’s cinema halls is in the context of a terror attack.

Related Stories FDA to start regulating health-related smartphone apps Parents can target what their kids watch on their phones, tablets and TVs, thanks to a new digital video service. Target Ticket launched by the discount chain store offers a whopping 30,000 movies and television shows to buy, rent, download or stream starting at 99 cents. Titles include blockbuster releases like Iron Man 3 and Star Trek Into Darkness and HBO shows like Game of Thrones and True Blood. RELATED: WHAT THE EMMY VOTERS GOT RIGHT – AND WHAT THEY GOT WRONG But parents have the ultimate say about their kids viewing options. The big-box retailer partnered with San Francisco-based nonprofit Common Sense Media, which provides movie and TV reviews, to make it easier for users to select age-appropriate content for their kids. Melinda Sue Gordon/AP Target are aiming to compete with Netflix, which offers its own original series like ‘House of Cards.’ The political drama, which stars Kevin Spacey, won three awards at the 2013 Emmys. Worried parents can also set filters according to the level of violence and profanity and ratings given by the Motion Picture Association of America. PHOTOS: EMMY AWARDS 2013 NOMINATIONS ANNOUNCED They can customize profiles for family members so they can watch varied content simultaneously on different devices. The service is aimed at parents who want a kid-safe, easy- to-use service, the company says. Viewers can watch rented content as many times as they want within a 48-hour period. Target Ticket is currently available on PCs, Macs, Android and iOS, along with Internet-connected TVs and Xboxes. Guests can visit TargetTicket.com to access the service or download the app through the App Store or Google Play.

Bollywood returns to Kashmir, movies don’t

Spielberg’s adaptation was groundbreaking for the industry, in an “Avatar” sort of way, as it was a revolutionary use of CGI and animatronics. “American Psycho” Oh, Bret Easton Ellis. His books, not to mention his tweets, can be gratuitously graphic. But director Mary Harron managed to morph his story into a terrifically transgressive story, lauded by both critics and academics. We think the casting may be to thank for this one. “The Shining” This is an incredible book, with an equally incredible sequel (you can read an excerpt from “Doctor Sleep” here). But Jack Nicholson’s performance, along with the eerie soundtrack and creepy-as-hell shots of identically-dressed children makes this film a classic. The book, on the other hand, is not King’s most critically acclaimed. “Precious” Sapphire’s book is inventive, to be sure: protagonist Precious begins writing when she’s semi-illiterate, and uses phonetic spellings. But the film, co-produced by Tyler Perry and Oprah, was an excellent platform for Gabourey Sidibe’s acting. “Drive” The neo-noir novel is great, but could get lost among a sea of other well-written pulp fiction books. The movie, on the other hand, is unique: It’s at once campy and subtly touching. And, okay, it’s also Ryan Gosling at his best. “Silence of the Lambs” This novel was critically acclaimed — Roald Dahl called it, “subtle, horrific and splendid, the best book I have read in a long time,” and David Foster Wallace used to assign it to his students.